6 Tips for Getting a Pay Rise

A pay raise rarely falls into someone’s lap. If you think you deserve one we can help you in getting a pay rise. You could be working your ass off trying to prove your worth to your company. This hard work may be going unnoticed or may be recognized in intangible ways. You feel it’s time for your hard work to be recognised. The next step you take will be talking to your boss about a pay raise. This article shares some useful tips for doing what is necessary when it comes to getting a pay rise.

1. Know the Market Value of Your Position

Initiating a discussion with your boss makes no sense if you’re oblivious to the real value of your position. You can’t be asking your boss for a 2,500 per month salary if the highest paid person in your role in the country is only earning 2,000 per month. Visit PayScale.com or Glassdoor.com to get more information about market value rates for a variety of positions.

2. Think About Your Approach

Knocking on your boss’ door and saying, “Hey, I think it’s time I get a raise,” won’t get you very far. You’ll probably see your boss raise his or her eyebrows and slam the door in your face. Instead, start the conversation around getting a pay rise by asking your boss about your performance.  If you’ve really been going above and beyond, you should hear nothing but glowing reviews. Focus on pointing out how you’ve contributed to the company’s development instead of making your comments personal.

This feedback provides the best opportunity to point out that you’re making less than others in comparable positions. You can then use this point to ask for a salary adjustment so that you’re being paid a fair wage. Allow your boss to process the information and get back to you with a response.

3. Allow Silence

Pause for a few minutes after you’ve made your case. Silence may fill the gap, but that silence provides your employer with the opportunity to truly consider your arguments. Listen carefully to the response. If the answer is no, ask what you can do to ensure that you get a raise in the future. This will highlight that you are serious about getting a pay rise, and are also willing to work for it.

4. Avoid Threats

Becoming defensive will get you nowhere. Threats become even more unappealing when they’re false. For instance, telling your boss that you have other job offers will get you nowhere. This especially true if his job offer is non-existent. Stick to the facts of the contribution you’ve made to the company. Use these positive facts to build your case.

5. Avoid Personal Issues

Your boss doesn’t need to hear about your life. Keep your personal life out of the equation. The only areas your boss is really interested in is the value you add to the company. Prove that you truly do add value. Show your progress to date, targets that have been met (even better if they’ve been exceeded), and any projects/initiatives you might have spearheaded. The key to getting a pay rise is to show your strengths and highlight your performance. Just clocking in each day, and doing the bare minimum probably won’t cut it. 

6. Get Recommendations

Ask people you’ve worked with in the company to endorse the work you’ve done. These recommendations/endorsements can be in verbal form through a phone call or in written form via an email. Hearing glowing reviews from other people can help your case. It can also be useful to advice from others, this careers group is the ideal place to get insight on how others have done it. 

If you’re still not feeling confident, we recently spoke with Life and Executive coach, Sharon Rossignuolo, about being “Sasha Fierce At Work” –  watch the full video below.

Don’t be afraid to approach your boss for a raise. You deserve to get paid what you’re worth. However, you have to carefully plan your approach. Schedule a meeting with your boss and present the facts. Leave emotions and personal issues out of the conversation.  The worst you can hear is no, but the possibility also exists that you could hear yes. Have we missed any tips that you’d like to share around getting a pay rise? Let us know in the comments. 

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Christine McLean

Blogger, author, mathematics teacher. Although I hold a BSc in Mathematics with Education and have been teaching for over 4 years, writing has given me a voice I never knew I had. I began my blog "Christine Speaks" in 2013 and have used it to convey my thoughts, feelings, and ideas freely. Since then, I have written website content for over 20 websites and 2 e-books.

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12 comments

  1. Ohh how many times havent I heard complains from people that they work the arse off and dont get enough pay. Sadly most of them dont do anything about it because they are mostly afraid of getting replace.

  2. As a self-employed gal, getting a pay raise comes from harder work! Thanks for the tips, though, should I get a brick and mortar job!

  3. These are such great tips. It can be hard so difficult to ask for a raise but this really helps you break it down and feel more manageable.

  4. I’ve never had to face asking for a raise in my line of work. It’s something I would dread doing since I am very shy when it comes to money matters. Nice tips!

  5. allow silence was a great tip indeed. Not many people realise the importance of giving the other person some time to take all the information in and consider your proposal! Great post!

  6. Yes, these are great! Knowing the market value is super important. Knowing your worth before you go in…takes some research but well worth it. And yes, allowing silence and not feeling the need to fill every silence.

  7. These are good tips. Especially knowing your worth, also figuratively.
    If the boss still deny, then its time to leave.
    There are many opportunities!

  8. These are really great tips one must definitely share. Especially the “avoid treats” part. Every time i hear someone asked for a raise, a treat comes to the conversation. Like seriously.

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